Archive for the 'graph' Category

Delivering unstoppable data to unstoppable apps is now possible with Streamr Network

Streamr is a layer zero protocol for real-time data which powers the decentralized Streamr pub/sub network. The technology works in tandem with companion blockchains - currently Ethereum and xDai chain - which are used for identity, security and payments. On top is the application layer, including the Data Union framework, Marketplace and Core, and all third party applications. 

In this episode I have a very interesting conversation with Streamr founder and CEO Henri Pihkala

 

References

 

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Your data is worth thousands a year. Why aren’t you getting your fair share?
There is a company that has a mission: they want you to take back control and get paid for your data.
In this episode I speak about knowledge graphs, data confidentiality and privacy with Mike Audi, CEO of MyTiki.
 
 
You can reach them on their website https://mytiki.com/
 
Discord official channel

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In this episode I am with Jadiel de Armas, senior software engineer at Disney and author of Videflow, a Python framework that facilitates the quick development of complex video analysis applications and other series-processing based applications in a multiprocessing environment. 

I have inspected the videoflow repo on Github and some of the capabilities of this framework and I must say that it’s really interesting. Jadiel is going to tell us a lot more than what you can read from Github 

 

References

Videflow Github official repository
https://github.com/videoflow/videoflow

 

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In this episode I explain how a community detection algorithm known as Markov clustering can be constructed by combining simple concepts like random walks, graphs, similarity matrix. Moreover, I highlight how one can build a similarity graph and then run a community detection algorithm on such graph to find clusters in tabular data.

You can find a simple hands-on code snippet to play with on the Amethix Blog 

Enjoy the show! 

 

References

[1] S. Fortunato, “Community detection in graphs”, Physics Reports, volume 486, issues 3-5, pages 75-174, February 2010.

[2] Z. Yang, et al., “A Comparative Analysis of Community Detection Algorithms on Artificial Networks”, Scientific Reports volume 6, Article number: 30750 (2016)

[3] S. Dongen, “A cluster algorithm for graphs”, Technical Report, CWI (Centre for Mathematics and Computer Science) Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2000.

[4] A. J. Enright, et al., “An efficient algorithm for large-scale detection of protein families”, Nucleic Acids Research, volume 30, issue 7, pages 1575-1584, 2002.

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Today I am with David Kopec, author of Classic Computer Science Problems in Python, published by Manning Publications.

His book deepens your knowledge of problem solving techniques from the realm of computer science by challenging you with interesting and realistic scenarios, exercises, and of course algorithms.
There are examples in the major topics any data scientist should be familiar with, for example search, clustering, graphs, and much more.

Get the book from https://www.manning.com/books/classic-computer-science-problems-in-python and use coupon code poddatascienceathome19 to get 40% discount.

 

References

Twitter https://twitter.com/davekopec

GitHub https://github.com/davecom

classicproblems.com

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Since the beginning of AI in the 1950s and until the 1980s, symbolic AI approaches have dominated the field. These approaches, also known as expert systems, used mathematical symbols to represent objects and the relationship between them, in order to depict the extensive knowledge bases built by humans.
The opposite of the symbolic AI paradigm is named connectionism, which is behind the machine learning approaches of today

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